Bloating Tips Logo Bloating Tips | Probiotics For Bloating


Top Contributors

  • Gravatar Pweng Bee 15 posts
  • Gravatar Brendan O'Loughlin 10 posts
  • Gravatar Yasmin 6 posts

Probiotics For Bloating

Written by Adam Whitby

Probiotics are often referred to as your body's 'good bacteria'.  The official definition states that a probiotic is a live microorganism which will confer health benefits on the human host.  Some of these benefits for example include the way in which probiotics help to break down food and extract minerals and nutrients essential to the body. There are many types of probiotic bacteria, one of the most well-known is called Lactobacillus acidophilus or L. acidophilus for short.

Probiotics help break down minerals and nutrients for your body

So what could probiotics have to do with bloating, and how might they help?

Your gut is home to over 100 trillion bacteria and outnumber human cells in your body by a ratio of 10:1. Interesting fact; up to 1.5kg of your weight is made up of bacteria alone!

Therefore, the hundreds of thousands of species and strains of bacteria in your body play an important role in your health. Making sure your bacteria is well-balanced between the 'good' and the 'bad' is thought to be essential in maintaining strong and healthy digestive and immune systems. Research has shown that an imbalance of good and bad bacteria in the gut, known as dysbiosis, can result in a number of digestive health conditions such as;

An imbalance of good and bad bacteria can be addressed with a probiotic supplement

Dysbiosis can be caused by a number of factors, including poor diet, high sugar levels (as sugar feed pathogens in the gut), antibiotics, stress and ageing. If your bloating is a symptom of dysbiosis, taking a probiotic supplement can be a positive step to rebalancing your body's good bacteria, thereby helping with bloating by looking at the root cause of the problem, as opposed to simply treating the symptoms in the short term.

Which Probiotics for Bloating?

Lactobacillus acidophilus Rosell-52

If you want to try a probiotic for bloating I suggest you find a supplement with well-researched strains (specific types of the bacteria), such as Lactobacillus acidophilus Rosell-52 or Lactobacillus casei Rosell-215, which have both been shown to help with bloating in particular.

Something similar to consider is a 'prebiotic' which is a natural source of fibre also thought to help with the problem of bloating. Prebiotics are substances that encourage friendly bacteria to thrive, so a combination of the two can be extra effective. Probiotics and prebiotics also have the added benefits of supporting your immune system to make it more effective in tackling bacterial infection, and increasing its ability to fight infections.

I am a fan of the brand OptiBac Probiotics. I'm sure you've noticed that OptiBac sponsors this site, but I want to reassure you that I would recommend them nevertheless! The particular strains that they use are well researched, the products come in powdered sachets or capsules with no unnecessary additives, and most noteworthy, they have excellent reviews from customers. n(These have been collected by a separate company as proof of each reviewer's identity. Find out more about their review policy here). Also, take a look at these posts from bloggers who have tried them out: Chloe at Munch for Health, blogger Julie, beauty blogger Aimee. Probiotics are their area of expertise, you can find more about the company here. So yes, you can see that I am a big fan!

OptiBac Probiotics - For a flat stomachYou can find both probiotics (including Lactobacillus acidophilus Rosell-52 or Lactobacillus casei Rosell-215) and prebiotics in For a flat stomach. I would ideally recommend taking the For a flat stomach for one week, and then following up with
For daily wellbeing EXTRA Strength.

 

Otherwise, read more about natural remedies and bloating.


Have you tried probiotics before? If so what type, and to what results?
 

About Adam Whitby

Adam has been involved in health and medicine for over thirty years, mostly reviewing clinical studies for general practitioners, writing patient information leaflets and producing medical video programmes.

Comments — 0

Make a Comment

We use Gravatar to personalise your comments, if you don't have an account, you can create one here. Don't worry, you can still post without one. Thanks!